Negating negativity: thinking critically about critical thinking

In the name of “critical thinking,” I have noticed a tendency in the West for intellectuals to become not only reflective and deconstructive, but to frequently live in mentally aggressive/hostile, cynical, pessimistic, etc. states of mind. Although I would agree that being overly positive can bias one in various ways (e.g., to see only what you want to see and miss/ignore challenges, obstacles, etc.), being overly negative can bias one in opposite ways (e.g., to see only obstacles or challenges and miss/ignore what might be possible). So I think it is important to turn critical thinking against itself, and to be critical of becoming too negative of a person. To me, the main value of critical thinking is to acknowledge and let go of biases and assumptions, to become mentally detached and aware, to try to see and think clearly. Mental detachment is perhaps the primary activity/aspect of mindfulness meditation, as is awareness of vipassana meditation.

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Buddhism & the West need deeper engagement

As a Western academian, it frustrates me that bhikkhu(ni)s (Buddhist monks and nuns) and upāsakas/upāsikās (almost-monastic Buddhist householders) who either come from Asia or train in Asia seem to spend most of their time in the West interacting with New Age, hippy, seeker, etc. types of people, instead of working with more mainstream academians/scientists to reconcile Buddhist psychology with Western psychology. Both Buddhists and psychologists seem to acknowledge each other’s theories and methods superficially, but neither side seems very interested in engaging the other very deeply. Mindfulness is just the tip of a gigantic iceberg. Go deeper!