Constructing the present

“The present moment is not an absolute. It’s something that you’re [unconsciously] fabricating, and the goal of the practice is to learn how to fabricate it in a new [nirvanic] direction…. The present is here to be used, and the teachings are here to teach us how to use it wisely” (Thanissaro Bhikkhu, “The Use of the Present,” 2016-11-28).

The pain is over there… the pain is not me

For managing pain (or pleasure or boredom), here is a mindfulness technique that has worked well for me. Hold whatever part of the body or mind is in pain at a distance, look at it, and calmly/dispassionately repeat the following to yourself: “the pain is over there… the pain is not me.”

This seems to work for a few reasons:

  1. Calm, clear-headed, detached, dispassionate, etc. mental observation discourages the mind from creating things. It is like placing a buffer of empty space between the constructive part of the mind and the problematic construct.
  2. Pain is a more unconscious, automatic sensation, whereas suffering is a more conscious, habituated perception or psychological labeling of experience. Perceptions (like suffering and joy) can be more easily consciously managed than can unconscious sensations (like pain and pleasure). For example, when babies get injured, they often look to their parents to see how they should respond to, or feel about, the pain from the injury — is it no big deal, or should they cry? Similarly, adults can learn to separate their reactions to pain from their experience of pain.
  3. The body and mind are not a stable, eternal self. Like probably all phenomena in this world, the body and mind’s states are always changing, and follow a predictable, bell-curve-type pattern: they arise, they may stay awhile, then they decay and condition/become something else. If one can just disassociate oneself from the problematic thing or person for long enough, that thing and/or oneself are guaranteed to change on their own eventually, and they might change enough that the current problem is no longer a problem. Alternatively, if action is better than inaction for some reason (e.g., if the pain is being caused by a poisoned knife stuck in one’s arm, which one should quickly remove), the mental clarity and detachment of this technique should help one to make a good decision and take immediate action.

Like most meditation techniques, the benefits of this technique include that it doesn’t involve taking any expensive, possibly dangerous drugs, or losing one’s mental clarity or self-control; the cons include that it takes persistent, conscious effort and practice.

Please don’t buy a rabbit just for Easter

Please don’t ever buy a baby rabbit just for Easter. Rabbits are quiet prey who usually hate being handled by careless, noisy children. If a rabbit kicks the wrong way while being held incorrectly, it can fracture its spine and become paralyzed. And most people don’t like rabbits as much once they’ve reached adulthood. Many rabbits end up in animal shelters across the US every year. Unless you actually want to take care of a pet rabbit in the long-term, please just get a chocolate one instead.

Idea: using antique cigarette cases as Faraday-cage credit card wallets

Old, metal cigarette cases from the 1920s and 30s are often attractive, inexpensive, and exactly the right size for modern-day credit and ID cards. Like the metal mesh in microwave ovens (which stops the harmful microwaves from leaving the oven), or as when putting a cellphone inside a metal coffee can (which prevents the phone from wireless communications), metal boxes act as Faraday cages, preventing electromagnetic radiation from either entering or exiting, possibly thwarting credit card skimmers/scanners. Using a metal box as one’s wallet also has the benefit of protecting the contents much better than leather or canvas.

The swarm of self

According to early-to-medieval Buddhism, as I understand, the self and (probably) world are like swarms/flocks of bees, birds, or fish: each particle more-or-less doing its part for some larger purpose with more-or-less thought, each particle itself a swarm of smaller particles — momentary configurations of some basic, common-to-everything, connected-but-separate flashes (not stable points) of energy, with the swarm’s complexity having slowly aggregated/evolved over billions of years. A feeling of a stable self emerges from the swarm, but it is an illusion. Swarms of food, water, air, thoughts from other people or objects, etc. are constantly affecting or replacing parts of oneself. These are several ways in which ancient Buddhism was/is similar to modern physics, biology, and complex adaptive system theories.

“All composite things are impermanent. Strive for liberation [from this state of existence] with diligence” (the Buddha’s final words, my translation from Pali).

Selfish vs. selfless help

Western psychologists, whose young tradition often copies Buddhist techniques like mindfulness, charge sometimes hundreds of dollars an hour to teach people how to overcome their own suffering.

Buddhist monks/nuns, whose traditions have thousands of years of the kinds of “evidence-based experience” that Western psychologists brag about, do the same thing for the mere cost of putting a little food into their bowl.